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Walmart ends delivery partnership with Deliv – TechCrunch

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Walmart ends delivery partnership with Deliv – TechCrunch

Walmart in 2016 said it would begin testing last-mile delivery using services like Uber, Lyft, and Deliv to bring customers’ orders, including groceries, to their homes. Last year, Walmart ended its grocery delivery deal with Uber and Lyft, and today it’s ending the deal with Deliv as well, according to a report from Reuters.

Deliv had started working with Walmart in pilot markets, including Miami and San Jose, as one of the few services Walmart was testing for last-mile deliveries at the time. The retailer has since significantly expanded its delivery operations through an array of partners to markets across the U.S., in relatively short order.

Walmart this morning confirmed to TechCrunch that Deliv was not a large part of its operations. The retailer said Deliv was only working with 3 Walmart stores out of the total 800, and in only 1 market out of 100, at the time the deal ended.

The retailer in 2018 said it was on track to expand grocery delivery to more than 40 percent of U.S. households by year-end, meaning a jump from just 6 markets to over 100 metros during a year’s time. Uber and Lyft, however, were dropped in May 2018, as Walmart shifted more of its deliveries to other partners, like Postmates and DoorDash.

Last month, Walmart added a handful of new partners, as well, including Point Pickup, Skipcart, AxleHire and Roadie. It said it planned to expand grocery delivery from the 800 stores in 100 U.S. metros where it’s live now, to double that number by the end of 2019.

In Canada, Walmart works with Instacart, which also partners with Walmart’s Sam’s Club in the U.S.

Despite the quick expansion, Walmart’s decision to work with third-party courier services instead of bringing delivery operations in-house has led to some problems. Simple tasks, like allowing customers to change pickup orders to delivery or vice versa, are often impossible. Technical and logistical issues also often can’t be communicated directly from drivers to Walmart, but have to go through the third-party delivery partner.

According to Reuters, Deliv drivers were frequently having to wait up to 40 minutes for grocery orders when they arrived at the store for pickup, as Walmart was unable to process the online orders fast enough, the report claimed. The report also said delivery volume was low in some Walmart delivery markets, and orders had to travel long distances, which caused both Walmart and Deliv to lose money at times.

Related to Walmart’s decision to end its partnership with Deliv, the companies will also no longer operate the keyless entry test in partnership with smart lock maker August Home. Announced in fall 2017, the test would allow customers with August smart home devices to have their packages delivered inside their home, instead of left on the doorstep.

This gives Amazon an advantage in keyless entry, as its Key by Amazon product last month expanded to include garage and business delivery, new locks and Ring compatibility.

“In 2017 we began a pilot program with Deliv in San Jose to understand how the Walmart Grocery Delivery model would work with a scheduled platform,” a Walmart spokesperson told TechCrunch, confirming the news.

“As with any pilot, the intent is to learn and ultimately came to the conclusion that Deliv’s platform was not the best fit for our program. Today, we work with a number of third-party delivery companies operating an on-demand based platform, and we will continue to test different delivery approaches that will help us continue to learn,” they added.

 

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India’s top court finds Anil Ambani guilty on contempt in Ericsson case

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India's top court finds Anil Ambani guilty on contempt in Ericsson case

FILE PHOTO: Anil Ambani, chairman of the Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group, addresses shareholders during the company’s annual general meeting in Mumbai, India, September 18, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas/File Photo

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s Supreme Court said on Wednesday that Reliance Communications chairman Anil Ambani willfully did not pay 5.5 billion rupees to Swedish telecom equipment maker Ericsson, holding him guilty in a contempt of court case.

The court asked billionaire Ambani and two directors of RCom to pay 4.5 billion rupees to Ericsson within four weeks. They will face three months jail term if they fail to pay the amount, the court said.

The Swedish company signed a deal with RCom in 2014 to manage and operate its network and last year approached the court over unpaid dues of 5.5 billion rupees.

Reliance Communication said the company respect the court judgment and the “group shall comply with same.”

Reporting by Suchitra Mohanty; Writing by Rajendra Jadhav; Editing by Euan Rocha

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GM’s Arīv electric bikes are launching in Europe first

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Even though the company designed and engineered the bikes in Michigan and Oshawa, Ontario, it will release them in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands first. GM says it chose those locations “due to the popularity of lithium-ion battery-powered e-bikes in those markets,” which makes sense if you think about it.

The compact e-bike called Arīv Meld will set customers back between €2,750 and €2,800 (approximately $3,200). Meanwhile, the folding e-bike called Arīv Merge, which users can fold up and roll on two wheels if they want to, will set buyers back between €3,350 and €3,400 (around $3,900). Both models are now available for pre-order on Bike Exchange and will start shipping in the second quarter of 2019.

Ariv

Arīv Meld

ArīvArīv Merge

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EU’s Vestager says not precluding Facebook case in future

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EU's Vestager says not precluding Facebook case in future

FILE PHOTO: The entrance sign to Facebook headquarters is seen in Menlo Park, California, on Wednesday, October 10, 2018. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/File Photo

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Facebook is not currently in EU regulators’ crosshairs but it may well be in future because of the crucial role played by data, Europe’s antitrust chief said on Tuesday.

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager’s comments came two weeks after the German cartel office ruled that the world’s largest social network abused its market dominance to gather information about users without their consent.

Vestager said she has no case against Facebook regarding its market power for now but nevertheless was monitoring the market.

“We have some concerns. One thing is that we don’t have an open case now, that doesn’t preclude we don’t have a case in future. We are looking at the market very closely,” she told a European Parliament hearing.

The European Commission has previously indicated that Facebook’s issues could be better handled by privacy enforcers rather than by competition regulators.

Vestager has taken on tech giants including Google and Qualcomm in recent years and handed down million-euro fines for abusing their market power.

Reporting by Foo Yun Chee; editing by David Evans

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