Connect with us

Politics

Reeling from tariff threat, Mexico begins immigration talks in Washington

Published

on

Reeling from tariff threat, Mexico begins immigration talks in Washington

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Fighting to stave off punitive tariffs announced by U.S. President Donald Trump, a senior Mexican delegation was set to begin high level talks on Monday in Washington, where it will be pushed to do more to hold back Central American migrants.

Border gates are seen at the World Trade Bridge border with Mexico, in Laredo, Texas U.S. June 2, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Trump says he will apply tariffs of 5% on all Mexican goods on June 10, and increase the rate in coming months to 25% if Mexico does not substantially halt illegal immigration across the U.S.-Mexican border, which is at a decade high this year.

Global equities tumbled after Trump’s unexpected threat last week against the United States biggest trade partner, as investors feared his aggressive trade diplomacy could tip the United States and other major economies into recession.

With just a week until the first tariffs bite, the delegation led by Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard may have a hard time convincing U.S. officials that Mexico is doing enough on immigration to avoid punishment, despite having signaled in recent days it was prepared to further tighten security.

The U.S.-Mexican talks begin on Monday with a meeting between Mexican Economy Secretary Graciela Marquez and U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. On Wednesday, Ebrard meets U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Trump on Sunday called Mexico an “abuser” of the United States and said he wanted action, not talk. Mexico has signaled it would retaliate to the tariffs, with targets likely to include farm products on Trump supporting states.

In a possible sign of U.S. priorities in the talks, which are due to run through at least Wednesday, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan said on Sunday that Mexico should deploy more personnel to interdict illegal migrants along a 150 mile (241.4 km) stretch of border with Guatemala.

That border is a remote region of mostly jungle and river, and has traditionally been hard to police. The causes of Central American immigration are mainly related to lack of economic opportunity and rampant violence.

McAleenan also said Mexico should bolster its own immigration screenings along its southern border, crack down on networks transporting migrants and enable more migrants to wait in Mexico while they apply for asylum in the United States.

Since January the government of President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has ramped up detentions and deportations, but that has not been enough to stop the growing tide of families reaching the United States, mainly from Guatemala and Honduras.

In May, numbers are expected to have outpaced the 99,000 people apprehended at the border in April, with many of those crossing in groups of families who will mostly be released to await asylum hearings in the United States.

In its biggest concession to Trump so far, Mexico agreed in December to receive some Central Americans seeking asylum in the United States to await the resolution of their cases.

So far more than 6,000 people have been sent into Mexico under the program, which operates at three crossings and is commonly known as “Remain in Mexico”.

DHS intends to increase the number of returns under “Remain in Mexico”, a spokeswoman said on Saturday, saying there were plans to expand the program, although new crossings had not been officially designated.

A more radical idea that has long been promoted by the DHS and may again be on the table in talks this week despite previously being a red line for Lopez Obrador, is to make Central Americans apply for Mexican asylum, not U.S. asylum.

Under this policy, Mexico could be declared a “safe third country.” Rights groups argue that leaving asylum seekers in Mexico puts them at risk, since it suffers from similar levels of violence to the places they are fleeing.

The ultimatum from Trump is the biggest foreign policy test to date for Lopez Obrador. Aside from struggling to combat migrant flows, Mexican security forces are also fighting endemic gang violence.

In a series of tweets on Sunday, Trump extended his demands on Mexico beyond immigration, demanding it stopped an “invasion” of drug dealers and cartels.

A cargo train coming from Mexico is seen crossing the border into the U.S., as seen from Laredo, Texas, U.S. June 2, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

In April, Trump took a step back from an earlier threat to completely close the U.S. border with Mexico to fight illegal immigration, under pressure from companies worried it would cause chaos for businesses.

Mexico’s economy, which is heavily reliant on exports to the United States, shrank in the first quarter and would suffer a lot more if Trump were to jack tariffs up all the way to 25 percent.

Trump’s aggressive trade diplomacy, both with Mexico and China, has scared investors away from riskier assets in global markets, as they fear it could tip the United States and other major economies in to recession.

Additional reporting by Kristina Cooke in San Francisco; Editing by Simon Cameron-Moore

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Politics

Trump accuser says most people think of rape as being ‘sexy’ in interview

Published

on

By

Trump accuser says most people think of rape as being 'sexy' in interview

E. Jean Carroll, the writer who accused President Trump of sexually assaulting her in the mid-1990s, raised eyebrows when she said in an interview that most people consider rape “sexy.”

The longtime advice columnist for Elle Magazine appeared on the channel to detail the allegations from 23 years ago in a dressing room. She said the incident wasn’t “sexual” and likened it to a “fight.”

LONGTIME ADVICE COLUMNIST E. JEAN CARROLL ACCUSES TRUMP OF SEXUAL ASSAULT IN 1990S

“I was not thrown on the ground and ravaged. The word rape carries so many sexual connotations. This was not sexual. It just hurt,” she said.

Anderson Cooper, the CNN host, asked Carroll about her refusal to use word rape and pointed out that most people describe rape as a violent assault.

“I think most people think of rape as being sexy. Think of the fantasies,” Carroll replied. The interview was interrupted by a commercial break.

New York magazine on Friday published the allegations as part of an excerpt from her forthcoming book in which she accuses Trump, and other men, of improper sexual behavior.

She claimed the Trump incident occurred at Bergdorf Goodman in either the fall of 1995 or the spring of 1996. Trump has denied the allegations. He was criticized for saying in an interview that she is not his type.

Carroll is known for her “Ask E. Jean” column, which runs in Elle magazine.

WINNING UGLY? MEDIA HIT TRUMP STYLE OVER IRAN, BUT SOMETIMES IT WORKS

In the excerpt, Carroll, who had a daily advice show at the time, said Trump recognized her and asked for her help choosing a gift. She said they eventually made their way into the lingerie section, and then a dressing room.

“The moment the dressing-room door is closed, he lunges at me, pushes me against the wall, hitting my head quite badly and puts his mouth against my lips,” Carroll wrote. In explicit detail, Carroll wrote that Trump held her against a wall and pulled down her tights.

“The next moment, still wearing correct business attire, shirt, tie, suit jacket, overcoat, he opens the overcoat, unzips his pants, and, forcing his fingers around my private area, thrusts his penis halfway — or completely, I’m not certain — inside me,” she said. “It turns into a colossal struggle.”

After coming forward with her allegations, Carroll told MSNBC on Friday that despite the alleged ordeal, she won’t pursue the allegations in court due to the migrant detention situation at the southern border, saying it would be “disrespectful.

“I would find it disrespectful to the women who are down on the border who are being raped around the clock down there without any protection,” Carroll said. “As you know, the women have very little protection there. It would just be disrespectful.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Trump released a lengthy statement vehemently denying the allegations: “I’ve never met this person in my life. She is trying to sell a new book — that should indicate her motivation. It should be sold in the fiction section.”

Continue Reading

Politics

Trump reassures Tokyo he will stick with security pact: Japan government

Published

on

By

Trump reassures Tokyo he will stick with security pact: Japan government

TOKYO (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday reassured Japan he was committed to a military treaty that both nations have described as a cornerstone of security in Asia, after a media report said he had spoken privately about withdrawing from the pact.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during delivering a speech to Japanese and U.S. troops as they aboard Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF) helicopter carrier DDH-184 Kaga at JMSDF Yokosuka base in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Japan, May 28, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha/File Photo

Citing unidentified sources, Bloomberg reported on Monday that Trump had discussed ending the pact which he believed is one-sided because it obligated the United States to defend Japan if attacked but did not require Tokyo to respond in kind.

The report said Trump was also unhappy with plans to relocate the U.S. base on Japan’s Okinawa island.

“The thing reported in the media you mentioned does not exist,” chief government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo when asked about the report.

“We have received confirmation from the U.S. president it is incompatible with the U.S. government policy,” he added.

Under the security agreement, the United States has committed to defend Japan, which renounced the right to wage war after its defeat in World War Two.

Japan in return provides military bases that Washington uses to project power deep into Asia, including the biggest concentration of U.S. Marines outside the United States on Okinawa, and the forward deployment of an aircraft carrier strike group at the Yokosuka naval base near Tokyo.

Ending the pact, which also puts Japan under the U.S. nuclear umbrella, could force Washington to withdraw a major portion of its military forces from Asia at a time when China’s military power is growing.

It would also force Japan to seek new alliances in the region and bolster its own defenses, which in turn could raise concern about nuclear proliferation in the already tense region.

Washington’s close ties to Tokyo have also benefited U.S. military contractors such as Lockheed Martin Corp and Raytheon Co, which have sold billions of dollars of equipment to Japan’s Self Defense Forces.

On a visit to Japan in May, Trump said he expected Japan’s military to reinforce U.S. forces throughout Asia and elsewhere as Tokyo bolsters the ability of its forces to operate further from its shores.

Part of that military upgrade includes a commitment by Japan to buy 97 F-35 stealth fighters, including some short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL)B variants worth more than $8 billion.

Japan says it eventually wants to field a force of around 150 of the advanced fighter jets, the biggest outside the U.S. military, as it tries to keep ahead of China’s advances in military technology.

Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka; writing by Tim Kelly; editing by Darren Schuettler

Continue Reading

Politics

U.S. president confirms no withdrawal from security pact: Japan

Published

on

By

Civil rights groups sue Tennessee over law imposing new penalties on voter registration

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s top government spokesman said on Tuesday the United States has confirmed its defense treaty with Japan after a report suggested U.S. President Donald Trump considered withdrawing from the pact.

Bloomberg reported on Monday that Trump has recently spoken privately about withdrawing from the treaty as he is of the view that the pact treated the United States unfairly.

“The thing reported in the media you mentioned does not exist,” Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo.

“We have received confirmation from the U.S. president it is incompatible with the U.S. government policy,” he added.

Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka; editing by Darren Schuettler

Continue Reading

Categories

Recent Posts

Like Us On Facebook

Trending