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Kamala Harris, pushing legal marijuana, says she smoked pot in college: ‘And I inhaled’

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Kamala Harris announces packed schedule of visits to early-primary states

California Sen. Kamala Harris, reiterating her support for marijuana legalization at the federal level, acknowledged Monday that she’s smoked pot in the past, saying: “I have. And I inhaled. I did inhale.”

The 2020 Democratic presidential contender, in discussing the broader use of the drug, said, “I think it gives a lot of people joy. And we need more joy in the world.”

WARREN LAUNCHES 2020 CAMPAIGN 

Harris made her comments on “The Breakfast Club,” the New York City-based nationally syndicated radio program hosted by DJ Envy, Angela Yee and Charlamagne tha God. The program touts that it is “the world’s most dangerous morning show.”

“It was a long time ago but yes. I just broke news,” the senator and former Golden State attorney general said as she discussed her past pot use. She added that she smoked weed in college and that “it was a joint.”

The subject came up when Harris, the daughter of Indian and Jamaican immigrants, was asked by the hosts about rumors she opposes marijuana legalization.

“That’s not true. Look, I joke about it, I have joked about it. Half my family is from Jamaica, are you kidding me,” she said, laughing.

But Harris said “we need to research the impact of weed on a developing brain” and said measuring how marijuana impairs people who are driving needs to be addressed.

Harris supports a bill – introduced Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey, a rival for the Democratic presidential nomination – that would end the federal marijuana prohibition.

“Making marijuana legal at the federal level is the smart thing to do and it’s the right thing to do. Today, I’m announcing my support for @CoryBooker’s Marijuana Justice Act,” she tweeted in May of last year.

Booker spotlighted his calls for legalizing marijuana when he launched his presidential campaign earlier this month. Among those who support Booker’s bill are Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York – who’s launched a presidential exploratory committee – and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who’s seriously mulling making a second straight run for the White House.

FOX NEWS POLL: SUPPORT FOR LEGAL POT HITS HIGH

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who formally announced her candidacy on Saturday, has pushed for modernizing federal marijuana laws.

Recreational marijuana is legal in 10 states, with several more states weighing legalization this year. Thirty-three states have legalized medicinal marijuana.

Public opinion surveys suggest that calling for marijuana legalization is a winning issue with American voters. Nearly 60 percent of Americans said they supported legalizing marijuana in a Fox News Poll released a year ago.

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The country’s previous two presidents, Democrat Barack Obama and Republican George W. Bush, both admitted to smoking marijuana.

While President Trump has not acknowledged smoking pot, his administration’s tough stance on the drug may be easing. A year ago, under the leadership of then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the Justice Department rescinded Obama administration guidance allowing states to legalize pot without the threat of federal interference.

But Trump’s nominee to replace Sessions – William Bar – has indicated he won’t continue to enforce the crackdown implemented by Sessions.

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Barr to discuss executive privilege in Russia report: spokeswoman

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Barr to discuss executive privilege in Russia report: spokeswoman

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Attorney General William Barr testifies before a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington, U.S. April 10, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Attorney General William Barr plans to address whether executive privilege was invoked by the White House in the Russia report to be released on Thursday and also elaborate on Justice Department communications with the White House over the past several weeks, a Justice Department spokeswoman said on Thursday.

“He’ll address whether that was invoked and what that looked like,” spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said. Barr and his deputy, Rod Rosenstein, have planned a news conference on Thursday morning before the release of a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Reporting by Sarah N. Lynch; Writing by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

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Top Congressional Democrats call for Mueller to testify publicly

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Top Congressional Democrats call for Mueller to testify publicly

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office in Washington, U.S., April 15, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The top Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate on Thursday called on Special Counsel Robert Mueller to testify publicly about his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer criticized Attorney General William Barr for writing what they called a “slanted” summary letter and for planning a press conference before the expected release of the report detailing the probe’s findings on Thursday.

“We believe the only way to begin restoring public trust in the handling of the Special Counsel’s investigation is for Special Counsel Mueller himself to provide public testimony in the House and Senate as soon as possible,” Pelosi and Schumer said in a statement.

(This story has been refiled to correct the sequence of events of press conference and report.)

Reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

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Left will continue to ‘believe in Russia collusion’ even after Mueller report release, Byron York says

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Left will continue to 'believe in Russia collusion' even after Mueller report release, Byron York says

The Russia collusion narrative is unlikely to go away even after the Robert Mueller report is released later today, Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York predicts.

“A lot of Democrats have invested the last two years of their life in believing that there was collusion between Russia to fix the 2016 election. Don’t think they gonna give it up just because of this,” York told “Fox and Friends”.

“A lot of Democrats have invested the last two years of their life in believing that there was collusion between Russia to fix the 2016 election. Don’t think they gonna give it up just because of this.”

— Byron York

The prediction comes as Washington, D.C. is bracing for the release of the Mueller report that according to Attorney General William Barr didn’t establish collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

IN MUELLER REPORT’S RELEASE, TRUMP LOOKS FOR VINDICATION, BUT NEW FIGHTS LOOM

York pointed out that after Barr outlined the report’s conclusions in a letter and quoted Mueller stating that the evidence didn’t establish a conspiracy or coordination between Russia and the Trump campaign, many Democrats began doubling-down on the collusion charges.

“Immediately people on the left said maybe he couldn’t prove a criminal conspiracy but maybe there was some other sort of conspiracy. Or maybe he couldn’t prove to beyond a reasonable doubt but maybe there is evidence that the rest of us can believe,” York said.

“I really think we have already seen and they already tipped their hands that they are going to continue to believe in collusion.”

“I really think we have already seen and they already tipped their hands that they are going to continue to believe in collusion.”

— Byron York

On the obstruction of justice charges, York says those opposing President Trump will have even more to talk about after the report release as Mueller himself didn’t reach a conclusion about obstruction charges.

“If the Barr summary is pretty accurate, Mueller did not reach a conclusion about obstruction. That’s a question right there. He is a prosecutor. He has all the evidence. Why didn’t he reach some sort of conclusion?” he said.

FOX NEWS POLL: TRUMP POPULARITY HOLDING STEADY AFTER MUELLER SUMMARY RELEASE

“There will be a lot of ammunition, we know that already for Trump’s critics who say that firing James Comey or the Lester Holt interview or something else was proof of obstruction right there in front of our eyes. So I don’t think that argument is going to go away at all.”

Lastly, even if the Mueller report doesn’t find wrongdoing by Trump, it’s unlikely to end the talk of impeachment by Democrats even as the 2020 election nears.

“If you believed in impeachment before the Mueller report, why would you stop believing in it now?,” York said, pointing that there’s a conflict within the Democratic Party on how to proceed with this.

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“You have a lot of the leadership like Nancy Pelosi wanting to move on, these are the more senior people wanting to move on, wanting to focus on the legislative agenda,” he continued.

“But you are going to have the investigative committees, the judiciary committee, the intelligence committee investigating this stuff all the way until the next election.”

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