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Jakob Dylan recalls filming Tom Petty’s final on-camera interview for rock doc ‘Echo in the Canyon’

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Jakob Dylan recalls filming Tom Petty’s final on-camera interview for rock doc ‘Echo in the Canyon’

Jakob Dylan is eager to revisit the past.

The 49-year-old singer/songwriter is exploring the explosion of music that came out of California’s Laurel Canyon in the mid-‘60s as folk went electric. The rock doc, titled “Echo in the Canyon,” features never-before-heard stories behind some of the most iconic songs from the era (1965 to 1967) along with candid conversations with David Crosby, Michelle Phillips, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton, as well as Brian Wilson — just to name a few.

BOB DYLAN’S ‘BLONDE ON BLONDE’ COVER WAS AN ACCIDENT

The film also highlights Tom Petty’s final on-camera interview before his passing in 2017 at age 66 from a cardiac arrest.

Singer Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers perform during the halftime show of the NFL's Super Bowl game between the New England Patriots and the New York Giants in Glendale, Arizona, February 3, 2008. 

Singer Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers perform during the halftime show of the NFL’s Super Bowl game between the New England Patriots and the New York Giants in Glendale, Arizona, February 3, 2008. 
(Reuters)

“Tom Petty’s input for the film was much needed and appreciated because he was a teenager during the time of this music and a fan,” Dylan, who serves as the film’s executive producer, told Fox News. “We spoke to people who were there, and we spoke to people like my generation, who have gone back and researched and listened. It was really important to have somebody like Tom Petty, who was hugely influenced by the music as a teenager. And he was kind enough to share those stories with us.”

Long-time music manager and label executive Andrew Slater, who directed “Echo in the Canyon,” revealed that exploring one of music’s most magical eras was a no-brainer. Slater said the two men were inspired by Jacques Demy’s 1967 film “Model Shop” about a young man named George Matthews (Gary Lockwood) who is having a bittersweet affair with a French divorcee in California.

A poster for Jacques Demy's 1969 drama "Model Shop" starring Anouk Aimée and Gary Lockwood. (Photo by Movie Poster Image Art/Getty Images)

A poster for Jacques Demy’s 1969 drama “Model Shop” starring Anouk Aimée and Gary Lockwood. (Photo by Movie Poster Image Art/Getty Images)

“It showed us the city we live in at a time when things were very innocent and beautiful,” Slater explained. “And it reminded us of a period of music, which was actually a little before the film was shot. So we decided to go back. As we looked at the music from that period, the beginnings of California folk-rock, we started to look at the songs. And the songs led us to the stories of the bands, and the bands led us to the people… to sort of tell us about how life was, where they lived in Laurel Canyon and why they wrote those songs.”

ELVIS PRESLEY’S PAL TELLS ALL

Jakob Dylan performs during the 2018 LA Film Festival opening night premiere of "Echo In The Canyon" at John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on September 20, 2018, in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Film Independent)

Jakob Dylan performs during the 2018 LA Film Festival opening night premiere of “Echo In The Canyon” at John Anson Ford Amphitheatre on September 20, 2018, in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Film Independent)

Viewers will notice that Dylan’s father, fellow singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, is not in the documentary and was only mentioned once. Over the years, the folk icon’s son has fiercely protected his family history and has previously admitted to feeling uncomfortable being frequently asked about the famous patriarch. Bob, 78, is also notoriously private and rarely gives interviews, especially on-camera.

The Wallflowers frontman did share that over the years, the signature sound of Laurel Canyon has inspired him as an artist.

The Mamas and the Papas: L-R John Phillips, Mama Cass Elliot, Denny Doherty and Michelle Phillips (Photo by GAB Archive/Redferns)

The Mamas and the Papas: L-R John Phillips, Mama Cass Elliot, Denny Doherty and Michelle Phillips (Photo by GAB Archive/Redferns)

“The songwriters from Laurel Canyon have been inspiring,” he said. “You know, even for people who aren’t aware that they’re a fan of Laurel Canyon, they are a fan of those bands and those songs, whether it’s The Byrds or Mamas and Papas. We grew up knowing those songs, and then it’s my nature to look into things, if I’m interested in them, a little bit further. So if you do look into it further and you’re interested, you’ll find out there is a tremendous scene in Laurel Canyon that we hopefully made a decent movie about, that reflects that. I was always aware of that music and of the songwriters. I always like the songwriters.”

Slater said he was fascinated by how these iconic musicians easily found inspiration in a dreamy utopia where community and songwriting thrived.

This Feb. 28, 1968 file photo shows The Beatles, from left: Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison.

This Feb. 28, 1968 file photo shows The Beatles, from left: Paul McCartney, John Lennon, Ringo Starr and George Harrison.
(AP)

KISS SINGER PAUL STANLEY TELLS ALL

“You know, the film is more about the echo than it is about the Canyon,” he said. “The Canyon is where people lived, but it’s really about the exchange of ideas between all of these artists. And in the film, you learn that Roger McGuinn saw The Beatles. He picked up the Rickenbacker 12 string, and he electrifies folk music by changing the arrangement of ‘Bells of Rhymney’ by Pete Seeger and ‘Turn, Turn, Turn.’ And then George Harrison hears that and he writes ‘If I Needed Someone,’ which goes on ‘Rubber Soul.’ Brian Wilson hears that, and he writes ‘Pet Sounds.’ And then The Beatles hear ‘Pet Sounds,’ and they do ‘Sgt. Pepper.’”

The Byrds, from left: Chris Hillman; Dave Crosby; Mike Clark; Jim McGuinn; and Gene Clark. (Photo by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

The Byrds, from left: Chris Hillman; Dave Crosby; Mike Clark; Jim McGuinn; and Gene Clark. (Photo by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)

“I think a number of people in the film mentioned its proximity to the Sunset Strip, but they’re also in the wilderness,” chimed Dylan. “I mean, literally, you’d be down the hill less than 10 minutes. But it gave them a feeling of being in the mountainous area, with nature, but then they can go right to the clubs in the evening to play… I think it was a community of artists that were able to see each other on foot and had a big part of it.”

Will music ever experience another similar Renaissance again? Slater insisted it’s actually happening now.

David Crosby performs onstage at The Greek Theatre on October 4, 2014, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Paul R. Giunta/Getty Images)

David Crosby performs onstage at The Greek Theatre on October 4, 2014, in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Paul R. Giunta/Getty Images)

“It’s happening in different places,” said Slater. “… In Echo Park, Silver Lake and Eagle Rock, there’s music being made and artists creating. And I think the spirit of community in Laurel Canyon if you can say that, exists in every major city in America. You just have to find it.”

STEVE MCQUEEN’S PAL TELLS ALL

Dylan said he hopes the “Echo in the Canyon” will introduce its soundtrack to young viewers discovering it for the first time — the same songs that continue to inspire him.

“I think it’d be nice for that scene and those people to have a definitive piece of film that tells the story the way they wanted to tell it,” said Dylan. “… That is what we let everybody do… This is just them reminiscing to some degree and telling us some of those stories. I guess if younger people, who might not find that music on their own because radio has changed so much and it’s harder to find music — if they get exposed to it, I think that’d be terrific.”

“Echo in the Canyon” is currently in theaters.

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Former Heaven’s Gate follower says he tried to pull girlfriend out of cult before shocking mass suicide in doc

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Former Heaven’s Gate follower says he tried to pull girlfriend out of cult before shocking mass suicide in doc

After 18 years, Frank Lyford trusted his gut and left the Heaven’s Gate cult — along with the woman he loved.

The former follower recalled his terrifying ordeal in the upcoming episode of “People Magazine Investigates: Cults,” which is airing on Investigation Discovery (ID) on June 17.

FORMER CHILDREN OF GOD MEMBER RESPONDS TO DOC ON CULT

The show, which recently kicked off its second season, explores how ordinary people “who, lured by promises of eternal life, get caught up in a terrifying web of abuse, deception and manipulation.” It features reporters who’ve covered these harrowing cases, as well as former members.

Marshall Herff Applewhite speaks on videotape. Applewhite, who founded the organization known as Heaven's Gate, lead 38 others in a mass suicide near San Diego. (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Sygma via Getty Images)

Marshall Herff Applewhite speaks on videotape. Applewhite, who founded the organization known as Heaven’s Gate, lead 38 others in a mass suicide near San Diego. (Photo by Brooks Kraft LLC/Sygma via Getty Images)

Past subjects have included the Jonestown Massacre, Nation of Yahweh, Children of God and the Tony Alamo Ministries, among others.

“It was this deep, gut-felt misgiving of remaining in the group, remaining in the cult,” said the now-65-year-old in the documentary, as reported by People magazine Friday. “I couldn’t express it at the time and I didn’t know what my life would look like — what it’d be like adjusting to life outside of the group — I just knew I couldn’t remain in the cult anymore.”

ALAMO CULT SURVIVOR DESCRIBES HORRIFYING BEATINGS: ‘I WANTED TO KNOW WHAT LIFE WAS LIKE BEYOND THIS’

History.com reported the cult was led by Marshall Applewhite, a former music professor who was recruited by one of his nurses, Bonnie Lu Nettles, after surviving a near-death experience in 1972. The pair then persuaded a group of 20 people from Oregon to abandon their possessions and move to Colorado where they promised an extraterrestrial spacecraft would take them to the “Kingdom of Heaven.”

Marshall Herff Applewhite and Bonnie Lu Trusdale Nettles are arrested by local police on August 28, 1974. Applewhite is charged with auto theft and Nettles is charged with the fraudulent use of credit cards. The two are believed to be the same who persuaded a number of people from Oregon to give up their worldly possessions and follow them in awaiting a UFO. They are leaders of a new sect called HIM (Human Individual Metamorphosis), better known as Heaven's Gate.

Marshall Herff Applewhite and Bonnie Lu Trusdale Nettles are arrested by local police on August 28, 1974. Applewhite is charged with auto theft and Nettles is charged with the fraudulent use of credit cards. The two are believed to be the same who persuaded a number of people from Oregon to give up their worldly possessions and follow them in awaiting a UFO. They are leaders of a new sect called HIM (Human Individual Metamorphosis), better known as Heaven’s Gate.

The outlet shared that both Nettles and Applewhite insisted human bodies were “merely containers” that could be disregarded for a higher physical existence. Membership diminished after the spacecraft never arrived and Nettles died in 1985. The group resurfaced in the ‘90s as Applewhite started recruiting new members. After the 1995 discovery of the comet Hale-Bopp, members believed that an alien spacecraft was on its way to earth.

Lyford and Erika Ernst had been dating for two years when the couple came across Applewhite and Nettles during a 1975 Oregon camping trip. They soon sold their belongings. Lyford defected in 1993.

Lyford soon found himself in his parents’ Canadian home. And two days later, he received a call from “the love of my life.”

According to People, Ernst pleaded Lyford to return and he asked her to leave. The 40-year-old never did.

Erika Ernst — ID

Ernst, along with 37 other followers, died by suicide over three days in 1997. Their bodies were discovered inside a Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. compound after someone called police with an anonymous tip. The deceased ranged from ages 26 to 72. People magazine previously reported the members left video diaries explaining their reasons for the mass suicide.

JIM JONES’ SONS RECALL JONESTOWN MASSACRE, DESCRIBE CULT LEADER’S DRUG ADDICTION

History.com reported that the mass suicide occurred around the same time Hale-Bopp reached its closest distance to Earth. Applewhite, who was among the dead, convinced the group they needed to “free their mortal souls in order to board a spaceship that was trailing behind the Hale-Bopp comet” heading towards a distant planet called “The Next Level.”

The bodies were found dressed in black suits with matching Nike sneakers and plastic bags over their heads. All had willfully ingested apple sauce laced with barbiturates, which was also washed down with vodka. Each had their IDs in their pockets.

A young Frank Lyford. — ID

A young Frank Lyford. — ID

“I knew it was the same group I was a part of, so it was a very emotional time for me, from the standpoint of feeling the loss of all my friends who I had been with for 18 years,” admitted Lyford.

FORMER NATION OF YAHWEH FOLLOWER RECALLS ESCAPING RUTHLESS CULT IN NEW DOC: ‘I RAN AS FAST AS I COULD’

Lyford said he wished he’d pushed Ernst harder to leave.

Frank Lyford and Erika Ernst. — ID

Frank Lyford and Erika Ernst. — ID

“If I were back on that call with her right now, I would be more emphatic about her leaving,” he explained. “We all have a connection to the divine within us, we all have that radio transmitter built in — we don’t need anyone to translate that for us. That was the big mistake that we all made, in my mind – it was believing we needed someone else to tell us what our best path should be.”

“People Magazine Investigates: Cults” airs June 17 at 9 p.m. on ID.

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CNN’s Anderson Cooper remembers mom Gloria Vanderbilt as visitor from ‘distant star’

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CNN's Anderson Cooper remembers mom Gloria Vanderbilt as visitor from 'distant star'

(Reuters) – CNN anchor Anderson Cooper remembered his mother, designer and society grand dame Gloria Vanderbilt, as a woman who endured a string of heartbreaks but still remained deeply in love with love.

Actress Gloria Vanderbilt speaks at a panel for the HBO documentary “Nothing Left Unsaid” during the Television Critics Association Cable Winter Press Tour in Pasadena, California, January 7, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

“I always felt it was my job to protect her. She was the strongest person I ever met but she wasn’t tough,” Cooper said in a seven-minute video youtu.be/cfbRneB9wcA obituary on CNN.

“I always thought of her as visitor from another world, a traveler stranded here who had come from a distant star that had burned out long ago.”

Vanderbilt, who died on Monday at age 95, had been famous her entire life, starting with a legal battle in which her aunt took custody from her mother when “Little Gloria” was a child. She would go on to endure four marriages, three divorces, the death of a husband and the suicide of a son.

Cooper’s obituary featured clips of young Gloria and told how she grew up in France, unaware that she was heir to the Vanderbilt railroad fortune. Portions also were taken from an HBO documentary “Nothing Left Unsaid: Gloria Vanderbilt & Anderson Cooper.”

When Cooper questioned why she first married a 32-year-old Hollywood figure, Vanderbilt told him, “Sweetheart, I was only 17.”

His mother “trusted too freely, too completely” but always pressed on, Cooper said, and always believed that the next true love was just around the corner.

“She was always in love – in love with men or with friends or books and art, in love with her children and her grandchildren and then her great-greatchildren,” Cooper said. “Love is what she believed in more than anything.”

Cooper said his mother learned earlier this month that she had advanced and spreading stomach cancer. Her response was to cite a 1950 hit song by Peggy Lee with the lyrics “show me the way to get out of this world because that’s where everything is.”

The CNN report included a video Cooper shot in a hospital after the diagnosis as he and his mother broke into laughing fits over a joke. Cooper said that was when he realized they had the same giggle. He said he still giggles every time he watches that video.

Writing by Bill Trott; Editing by Susan Thomas

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Jennifer Aniston had one requirement for Adam Sandler kissing scenes in ‘Murder Mystery’

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Jennifer Aniston had one requirement for Adam Sandler kissing scenes in 'Murder Mystery'

Jennifer Aniston had one rule for her kissing scenes in Netflix’s “Murder Mystery” with co-star Adam Sandler.

“I did have him learn to oil the beard up a little bit,” the actress said in a joint interview this week. “Conditioned.”

Sandler said kissing his longtime friend on camera wasn’t all that awkward, except when his wife Jackie and children were on set and encouraging him a little too much.

‘MURDER MYSTERY’ STARS JENNIFER ANISTON, ADAM SANDLER SAY WHO THEY WOULD PIN A MURDER ON

“The only awkward part is hearing my wife on the side going, ’Harder! Harder! Kiss her harder! Deeper!” he joked. “They (Jackie and the kids) watched the kissing. They love it. They love Aniston, and they want her to have good things and they say, ‘Give her something nice.’”

Adam Sandler, left, and Jennifer Aniston attend the "Murder Mystery" photo call at the Ritz-Carlton Marina del Rey on Tuesday, June 11, 2019, in Los Angeles.

Adam Sandler, left, and Jennifer Aniston attend the “Murder Mystery” photo call at the Ritz-Carlton Marina del Rey on Tuesday, June 11, 2019, in Los Angeles.
(AP)

“That was awkward,” Aniston agreed.

“Murder Mystery” follows a longtime married couple who get framed for murder while they’re unlikely guests on a billionaire’s yacht in Europe. The movie premiered on Netflix on Friday.

Fox News caught up with the stars last week and asked them who they would pin a murder on if given the chance.

Sandler, 52, was quick to answer: Rob Schneider.

JENNIFER ANISTON REVEALS WHO SHE HAS A CRUSH ON: ‘HE’S LIKE A SILVER FOX’

“It would be fun to hurt him. It would be fun to see him behind bars. And I would visit him every 10-15 years and say, ‘I’m sorry I did this to you,’” Sandler told us.

Rob Schneider arrives at the LA Premiere Of Netflix's "Murder Mystery" at Regency Village Theatre on June 10, 2019 in Westwood, California.

Rob Schneider arrives at the LA Premiere Of Netflix’s “Murder Mystery” at Regency Village Theatre on June 10, 2019 in Westwood, California.
(Getty)

“Oh yeah, you’d have to have some fun with Rob,” Aniston, 50, said.

When asked what Schneider ever did to deserve the blame in the hypothetical whodunit, Sandler simply said, “Nothing! That’s the beauty of this joke.”

Schneider wasted no time responding to Sandler’s admission, issuing a warning to his former “Saturday Night Live” co-star in a comment to Fox News on Friday.

ROB SCHNEIDER HITS BACK AT ADAM SANDLER, SAYS ‘IT WOULD BE FUN’ TO PIN HIM FOR MURDER: ‘I KNOW HIS SECRETS’

“I know all of Adam’s secrets for 30 years and that’s why he’d like nothing more than [to] lock me away for a crime he’d like to commit: taking away Kevin James’ Happy Meal!” Schneider teased.

Fox News’ Julius Young and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

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