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Ilhan Omar’s supporters rally outside Trump event in Minnesota

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Ilhan Omar's supporters rally outside Trump event in Minnesota

BURNSVILLE, Minn. (Reuters) – Supporters of U.S. Representative Ilhan Omar rallied outside a Minnesota business visited by U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday, after he launched a fresh attack on the Muslim-American lawmaker by calling her an “out of control” purveyor of “hate” speech.

Trump was in Minnesota, which Omar represents in Congress, for a tax reform roundtable.

Some of the Omar supporters who gathered outside Nuss Truck and Equipment in Burnsville, about 15 miles (24 km) south of Minneapolis, called on Democratic leaders in Washington to take a stand for Omar.

“Some of Ilhan’s words were taken out of context. I know that she abides by the Constitution. She is a proud American. She might have some opinions, but that shouldn’t put her in a position that we attack her,” said Abdullahi Farah, a Somali-American who attended the rally.

Omar, an immigrant from Somalia, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in November. She represents the state’s fifth congressional district, which is partially adjacent to the district Trump visited on Monday.

Writing on Twitter earlier in the day, Trump blasted both Omar and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for defending her, after he tweeted a video on Friday suggesting Omar had been dismissive of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

The video spliced news footage from 9/11 with a clip from a speech Omar gave last month in which she said “some people did something” in reference to the attacks.

“Before Nancy, who has lost all control of Congress and is getting nothing done, decides to defend her leader, Rep. Omar, she should look at the anti-Semitic, anti-Israel and ungrateful U.S. HATE statements Omar has made,” Trump wrote. “She is out of control, except for her control of Nancy!”

The Minnesota branch of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), a Muslim civil rights and advocacy group, responded to Trump’s attacks by organizing the rally, where people carried signs and chanted in support of Omar.

FILE PHOTO: Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) participates in a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Bourg/File Photo

Democrats “could have done more to help [Omar] out, but in the end I think they care more about their image,” said Abdirahman Abdullahi, an area resident.

About 200 people rallied in support of Omar while another 200 supporters of Trump gathered across the street and waved American flags.

Inside at the tax event, Trump railed against the U.S. immigration system and what he called its “horrible and foolish loopholes.”

Lawmakers from Trump’s Republican Party have accused Omar of minimizing the Sept. 11 attacks, while critics of the president say he took Omar’s words out of context in order to stoke anti-Muslim sentiment.

Omar was speaking at a CAIR banquet in California in March when she made her controversial remarks about 9/11. Omar also said Muslims had “lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it.”

Pelosi, in Europe leading a delegation, on Monday said the president should not use 9/11 as a political tool.

“I think that is wrong, I think it’s beneath the dignity of the office, and I don’t think that it plays that well, I hope that it doesn’t,” she said.

Omar said on Sunday that she had experienced an increase in threats on her life, many directly referencing or replying to the president’s video.

Pelosi said Sunday she had spoken with the House Sergeant-at-Arms to ensure that Capitol Police are conducting a security assessment to safeguard Omar, her family and staff.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump rallies with supporters in Chattanooga, Tennessee, U.S. November 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

The White House said Sunday that Trump did not wish any harm in last week’s Twitter post about Omar.

The House of Representatives approved a broad resolution condemning bigotry last month after remarks by Omar that some members of both parties viewed as anti-Semitic.

Writing by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee; additional reporting by Susan Cornwell and David Alexander; editing by Colleen Jenkins and Tom Brown

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Trump sues to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial information

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Republican convention set for August 2020 in Charlotte

Lawyers for President Trump on Monday sued to block a subpoena issued by members of Congress that sought the business magnate’s financial records.

The complaint named Rep. Elijah Cummings, the Democratic chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, and Peter Kenny, the chief investigative counsel of the House committee, as its plaintiffs.

“We will not allow Congressional Presidential harassment to go unanswered,” said Jay Sekulow, counsel to the president.

This is a breaking news story. Check back for updates.

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Congressman Moulton enters Democratic 2020 presidential race

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Congressman Moulton enters Democratic 2020 presidential race

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Representative Seth Moulton entered the 2020 Democratic presidential race on Monday as a long-shot contender in a contest that now includes almost 20 candidates.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Congressman Seth Moulton (D-MA) speaks at a Merrimack County Democrats Summer Social at the Swett home in Bow, New Hampshire, U.S., July 28, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo

A 40-year-old Iraq War veteran who represents a district in Massachusetts, Moulton enters the race as an underdog, with little national name recognition and a shorter track record than some rivals who have spent years in the U.S. Senate or as state governors.

Moulton has built a political career by challenging the party’s establishment. He entered Congress in 2015 after winning a Democratic primary challenge against John Tierney, who had held the seat for 18 years.

After Democrats took control of the U.S. House of Representatives in 2018, Moulton helped organize opposition to Representative Nancy Pelosi’s bid to again become Speaker of the House.

He ended his opposition to Pelosi with a statement saying: “Tough conversations make us stronger, not weaker, and we need to keep having them if we’re going to deliver on the change that we’ve promised the American people.”

In a YouTube video announcing his presidential candidacy, he said: “Decades of division and corruption have broken our democracy and robbed Americans of their voice.”

“While our country marches forward, Washington is anchored in the past,” he said.

In the video, Moulton said he wants to tackle climate change and grow the U.S. economy by promoting green jobs as well as high tech and advanced manufacturing.

Moulton served in the Marines from 2001 to 2008. During his 2014 congressional bid, he became a vocal critic of the Iraq War in which he served, saying no more troops should be deployed to the country.

He has advocated stricter gun laws, saying military-style weapons should not be owned by civilians.

Moulton supports the legalization of marijuana and told Boston public radio station WGBH in 2016 that he had smoked pot while in college.

He graduated from Harvard University with an undergraduate degree in physics in 2001 and returned to receive a master’s degree in business and public policy in 2011.

For a graphic of the 2020 presidential candidates, see: tmsnrt.rs/2Ff62ZC

Reporting by Ginger Gibson; additional reporting by Rich McKay; Editing by Colleen Jenkins, Jonathan Oatis, Kirsten Donovan and David Gregorio

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Trump sues to block subpoena for financial information

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Trump sues to block subpoena for financial information

U.S. President Donald Trump boards Air Force One as they travel to Florida for Easter weekend, at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, U.S., April 18, 2019. REUTERS/Al Drago

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Monday sued to block a subpoena issued by the Democratic chairman of the U.S. House Oversight Committee that sought information about his and his businesses’ finances.

“Chairman Cummings’ subpoena is invalid and unenforceable because it has no legitimate legislative purpose,” lawyers for Trump and the Trump Organization said in court filing.

Reporting by Makini Brice; Editing by Tim Ahmann

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