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Ilhan Omar ‘knows exactly what she is doing’ with comments deemed anti-Semitic, author says

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Ilhan Omar 'knows exactly what she is doing' with comments deemed anti-Semitic, author says

National Review Institute Fellow Victor Davis Hanson told Fox News on Wednesday he believes freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., knows “exactly what she is doing” with comments that’ve been judged by many to be anti-Semitic.

Hanson said the Democratic Party delayed a vote to condemn anti-Semitism because new progressive members would “walk” over their hatred of Israel.

“They have a problem because the Democratic Party leadership … they have to have a blanket, generic, meaningless statement because if they were actually going to be exact and focus and really oppose anti-Semitism, about a third of this new Democratic progressive party would walk,” Hanson said on “The Story with Martha MacCallum,” “because they really do not like Israel and they are very resentful of this Jewish state.”

Hanson pointed out that Omar’s primary focus has been Israel, while she has avoided focusing on other humanitarian crises spanning the globe.

“Why is it always just Israel and the Jews? And then she resents when people push back,” Hanson said. “We understand why you’re doing it, it represents your constituents, it represents the new wing of the Democratic Party. There’s benefits to be accrued. Go to it!”

“But then don’t get angry when people say, ‘Don’t try to fool us, we’re not stupid.’ Israel and the Jewish state have certain implications and we know what is going on and it’s anti-Semitic,” Hanson added.

Accusations of anti-Semitism have marred Omar’s three-month stint in Congress, and she’s been condemned by members of both parties.

She initially apologized but changed her tone recently.

MSNBC PANEL DEFLECTS OMAR CRITICISM, BLAMES TRUMP INSTEAD

Fellow freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., has continued to defend Omar, calling out other controversial utterances from other members of Congress.

“One of the things that is hurtful about the extent to which reprimand is sought of Ilhan is that no one seeks this level of reprimand when members make statements about Latinx+ other communities,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted Tuesday.

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Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, sees it differently, saying the “far-left” elements in the Democratic Party believe exactly what Omar is being accused of implying.

“There is a far-left wing of their party that … is in true disagreement with them. They truly do not like Israel.  They truly believe all the things that Omar has been saying,” Crenshaw told MacCallum. “She believes it. That should really be clear to everybody by now.  She’s been trying to tell us for a long time and it’s been explained away multiple times now. There’s been apologies made for her.”

Fox News’ Martha MacCallum contributed to this report.

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Record floods inundate U.S. Midwestern states as Pence arrives

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Record floods inundate U.S. Midwestern states as Pence arrives

BROWNVILLE, Neb. (Reuters) – Catastrophic floods devastated farms and towns in Nebraska and Iowa on Tuesday after leaving at least four people dead and causing hundreds of millions of dollars in damages, with waters yet to crest in parts of the U.S. Midwest for several days.

The floods inundated stretches of the two farm states along the Missouri River, North America’s longest river. Nearly half of Iowa’s 99 counties have been declared disaster areas.

Vice President Mike Pence was scheduled to inspect the destruction across the Midwest on Tuesday, after Nebraska, Iowa and Wisconsin declared states of emergency.

The floods followed a powerful winter hurricane that slammed into America’s Farm Belt last week, killing untold numbers of livestock, destroying grains and soybeans in storage, and cutting off access to farms due to road and rail damage.

“It’s really too early to know for sure how bad this is going to get. But one thing we do know: It’s catastrophic for farmers,” said Matt Perdue, government relations director for the National Farmers Union trade group.

Rescuers could be seen in boats pulling pets from flooded homes. Some roadways crumbled to rubble, while sections of others were submerged. In Hamburg, Iowa, floodwaters covered buildings.

In Brownville, Nebraska, floodwaters lapped at the edge of the small town of 132 people, closing the main bridge across the Missouri River.

“It’s a lot worse than I’ve ever seen it,” said Malina Wheeldon, who went ahead with the scheduled opening of her new Euphoric Soul Salon & Boutique business despite the floods. Her husband, Justin, who grew up in Brownville, agreed, saying he had lived through the floods of 1993, 2010 and 2011.

“About every five years now, we have a 100-year flood,” he said.

The Missouri was expected to crest at 47.5 feet (14.5 meters) on Tuesday, breaking its 2011 record by more than a foot (31 cm), the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency said. The flooding was expected to continue through Thursday.

ESTIMATED FARM LOSSES OF $1 BILLION

Nebraska officials estimate more than $1 billion in flood damage for the state’s agricultural sector so far, according to Craig Head, vice president of issue management at the Nebraska Farm Bureau. But Head said the number is expected to grow as floodwaters recede.

Flooded Offutt Air Force Base Is seen in this DigitalGlobe Satellite image over Nebraska, U.S., March 18, 2019. Picture taken on March 18, 2019. ©2019 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company/Handout via REUTERS

“We’re hoping it’s only $1 billion, but that’s only a hope,” Perdue said.

Nebraska officials estimate the floods have caused $553 million in damage to public infrastructure and other assets, as well as $89 million in privately owned assets, according to the state’s Emergency Management Agency on Tuesday.

The water also covered about a third of Offutt Air Force Base near Omaha, Nebraska, home to the U.S. Strategic Command, whose responsibilities include defending against and responding to nuclear attacks.

In Niobrara, Nebraska, south of the Missouri River near the border with South Dakota, Mayor Jody Stark said flooding that began on Thursday had devastated his community of 350 people, with businesses being the hardest hit.

“Our road system is shot pretty much in every direction coming into town,” Stark said.

“It’s one day at a time. We will do what we can to get back on our feet,” Stark said. “It’s just so heartbreaking. It’s going to be tough, but hopefully we can all get through it.”

Southwest Iowa Renewable Energy, which runs a 120 million-gallon-a-year (450-million-liter a year) ethanol production plant in Council Bluffs on the Iowa-Nebraska border, had to cut production because some corn farmers who supply the plant have determined some of their crops are unusable, said company Chief Executive Mike Jerke.

‘WE ARE WITH YOU’

Vice President Pence was scheduled to survey the damage with Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts and Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds.

“Heading to Nebraska today to survey the devastating flood damage. To the people of Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Kansas & all regions impacted: we are with you,!” Pence said in a post on Twitter early Tuesday.

The floodwaters were the result of snowmelt following heavy rains last week and warm weather, said Bob Oravec, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center.

The weather service’s website shows some locales along the Missouri River in Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri are expected to continue to see waters rise for several more days.

Slideshow (7 Images)

The four reported deaths included one person in Iowa who was rescued from floodwaters but later succumbed to injuries, the Fremont County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Roads leading to the Nebraska Public Power District’s Cooper nuclear plant near Brownville were engulfed by floodwaters from the Missouri, but the facility was still operating safely at full power on Tuesday.

The plant operator was flying staff members and supplies to the plant with helicopters, said power district spokesman Mark Becker.

Additional reporting by Gina Cherelus in New York, Rich McKay in Atlanta, Jarrett Renshaw in Philadelphia, P.J. Huffstutter and Mark Weinraub in Chicago; editing by Bill Tarrant and Jonathan Oatis

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Ocasio-Cortez blasts ‘injustice’ that prestigious New York City high school admitted few black students

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Ocasio-Cortez de-listed from board of Justice Democrats after controversy

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., charged on Tuesday that a selective New York public high school should have admitted more black applicants this year, saying their relatively low admit rate was an “injustice” and a “system failure” — although an objective state-mandated test is used to determine admissions decisions, and low-income Asian students took most of the spots.

In her fiery social media post, Ocasio-Cortez pointed to news reports that only seven black applicants secured offers of admission to Stuyvesant High School this year, out of 895 available slots.

“68% of all NYC public school students are Black or Latino,” Ocasio-Cortez began. “To only have 7 Black students accepted into Stuyvesant (a *public* high school) tells us that this is a system failure. Education inequity is a major factor in the racial wealth gap. This is what injustice looks like.”

The progressive New York Democrat cited a Monday New York Times report, which noted that the population of black students at Stuyvesant was seemingly decreasing: 10 were admitted in 2018, and 13 in 2017.

At the highly selective Bronx High School of Science, meanwhile, only 12 black students received offers of admission, compared with 25 in 2018.

But the report also mentioned several facts Ocasio-Cortez did not — including that “low-income” Asian students are a majority at New York City’s most selective schools. At Stuyvesant, for example, 74 percent of current students are Asian-Americans who performed very well on the admissions test, known as the Specialized High School Admissions Test, which is used by eight of New York City’s most selective high schools.

Approximately 19 percent of the students are white and 3 percent are Hispanic, according to school data.

HARVARD APPEARS TO PENALIZE ASIAN APPLICANTS, BOOST BLACK STUDENTS, EXPERT SAYS

The Times noted that state efforts to help students prepare for the test — including free test prep for minority students — have not helped change the admissions numbers in favor of black applicants.

“The numbers are abysmal; we knew that.”

— NYC public advocate Jumaane Williams

As a result, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio last year called for a new admissions system to New York’s most prestigious schools, which would simply scrap that test, and instead ensure that top students from each local middle school received admissions offers.

“These numbers are even more proof that dramatic reform is necessary to open the doors of opportunity at specialized high schools,” de Blasio said, responding to the Times’ report.

In an op-ed last year, de Blasio elaborated: “Eight of our most renowned high schools – including Stuyvesant High School, Bronx High School of Science and Brooklyn Technical High School – rely on a single, high-stakes exam. The Specialized High School Admissions Test isn’t just flawed – it’s a roadblock to justice, progress and academic excellence. If we want this to be the fairest big city in America, we need to scrap the SHSAT and start over.”

He added: “Right now, we are living with monumental injustice. The prestigious high schools make 5,000 admissions offers to incoming ninth-graders. Yet, this year just 172 black students and 298 Latino students received offers. This happened in a city where two out of every three eighth-graders in our public schools are Latino or black. … Can anyone defend this?”

Stuyvesant High School in New York, in JuneMARY ALTAFFER / AP

Stuyvesant High School in New York, in JuneMARY ALTAFFER / AP

But his proposal to eliminate the test remains unpopular in New York. A spokesperson for Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, said only that there were “two sides” to the issue, and Jumaane Williams, the city’s public health advocate, told the Times that he opposed scrapping the test.

“The numbers are abysmal; we knew that,” Williams, who is black, told the Times. “The question is what do we do about it, how do we do it without needlessly pitting communities against each other?”

Asian-Americans, backed by the Trump adminstration, have increasingly challenged what they characterize as Democrats’ insensitivity to racism directed at them by institutions and individuals. In one closely watched case, the Justice Department last year filed court documents siding with Asian-American students who allege Harvard discriminates against them in its admissions process.

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William Fitzsimmons, the 30-year dean of admissions at Harvard, who oversees the screening process of about 40,000 applicants and narrows them down to 2,000 acceptance letters that are handed out each year, testified during the trial that African-Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic high schoolers with mid-range SAT scores out of a possible 1600 combined math and verbal, are sent recruitment letters with a score as low as 1100, whereas Asian-Americans need to score at least 250 points higher – 1350 for women and 1380 for men.

“That’s race discrimination, plain and simple,” argued John Hughes, a lawyer for Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA).

Fox News’ Caleb Parke contributed to this report.

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Democrats’ calls to revamp Electoral College, Supreme Court reveal panic: Lara Trump

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Democrats' calls to revamp Electoral College, Supreme Court reveal panic: Lara Trump

President Trump’s senior campaign adviser and daughter-in-law Lara Trump blasted Democrats on Tuesday, including Democratic presidential contenders, after they called for changing the Electoral College and revamping the Supreme Court.

“I think it’s very clear that people are still upset on the left that their chosen candidate did not win in 2016.  They want to find any way they can to beat Donald Trump because I think they know it’s going to be incredibly hard, almost impossible to beat this president in the 2020 election,” Lara Trump said.

Her comments came after one 2020 contender, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., called for ending the Electoral College.

“My view is that every vote matters. And the way we can make that happen is we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” Warren said in Mississippi Monday.

Trump said talk of changing the Supreme Court is another sign of panic among Democrats.

“I think that it’s pretty clear that these folks are very upset that this president has had two Supreme Court placements now,” Trump said in response to various Democratic candidates calling for changes to how Supreme Court justices are selected.

“And quite likely if he gets a second term he will get a third.  So, I think you’re seeing … panic mode now on the Democrat side.”

“I think we need to fix the Supreme Court. I think they stole a Supreme Court seat,” Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., said on MSNBC Monday. He appeared to be referring to President Barack Obama’s late-term nomination of Merrick Garland for a Supreme Court seat, a nomination that did not get a confirmation hearing from a Senate then led by a GOP majority.

TRUMP FIRES BACK AT DEMS COURT PACKING PUSH

I think you’re seeing … panic mode now on the Democrat side.

— Lara Trump

Trump believes many of the candidates looking to secure the Democratic nomination are too far left with their platforms to beat President Trump in the general election.

“I really think when you look at the field these people are generally very, very far-left,” Trump told co-host Sandra Smith. “You look at people who are running in some cases on an almost socialist or fully socialist platform, that is not something I think the average person can get behind.”

Trump also addressed her father-in-law’s disapproval rating with women, saying she didn’t trust the polling and that many women are afraid to admit they support or voted for the president.

“They might not like all his tweets, they might not like everything he does, but at the end of the day I think they know he’s going to keep this country safe and prosperous,” Trump said.

SOMEONE IN THE STATE DEPARTMENT LIKELY INVOLVED IN THE BID TO TAKE DOWN TRUMP: HERRIDGE

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