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ChargePoint gives Europe equal billing in electric car grid plan

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ChargePoint gives Europe equal billing in electric car grid plan

LISBON (Reuters) – ChargePoint, which operates one of the world’s largest charging station grids for electric vehicles, expects to split a major expansion plan equally between Europe and its home market the United States, its chief executive said.

Pasquale Romano, Chief Executive Officer of ChargePoint, attends an interview with Reuters during the Websummit in Lisbon, Portugal November 7, 2018. REUTERS/Rafael Marchante

The company said in September it was aiming for 2.5 million charging points globally by 2025 and CEO Pasquale Romano told Reuters at the Web Summit conference in Lisbon that the increase was likely to be evenly split between Europe and the United States.

Europe is seen as potentially moving more quickly to electric vehicle adoption than the United States after President Donald Trump pulled out of the Paris climate agreement.

The 11-year-old firm, partly owned by German car makers BMW and Daimler, started selling in Europe in March and has reached around 1,000 points, out of a total of 60,000, which are mostly in the United States.

Growth in Europe will benefit from the phasing in of diesel car bans in parts of Europe in the 2020s, Romano said. As bans are phased in, diesel cars are likely to be swapped for electric vehicles, he said.

Norway, which is already a big market for electric cars and the single-biggest for Tesla cars, will ban all combustion-engine car sales from 2025. Big cities in Germany are planning diesel bans while Denmark and Britain plan to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars in the next two decades.

Silicon Valley-based ChargePoint supplies charging hardware and software. It has raised $125 million to expand in Europe, where it will compete against companies such as French utility Engie, Germany’s Innogy and E.ON, which are aiming at creating electric vehicle infrastructure.

ChargePoint does not own any re-charging stations but rather functions like an Airbnb or Uber to create a network of locations and schedule bookings at available charging points.

Romano would not put a figure on the company’s current sales but said “revenue growth is absolutely better than 50 percent year-over-year, we don’t see that slowing down at all.”

He said an initial public offering would be the “logical outcome” for the company but said there was no formal timeline for that.

Some auto industry experts have predicted that the world’s car fleet is set to start declining in coming decades because of congestion in many cities, prompting car sharing and greater use of public transport.

Romano said that did not worry him as ChargePoint was looking at markets for both individual car owners and fleets, such as bus companies in cities.

“As long as we are playing in both (markets), it doesn’t matter,” he said. “The funny thing is we are in a rising tide (of EV adoption) in a ultimately receding ocean (of car ownership),” he said.

Editing by Andrei Khalip. Editing by Jane Merriman

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Facebook and MIT tap AI to give addresses to people without them

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According to a paper published by the researchers earlier this month, the team trained a deep-learning algorithm to scan satellite images and identify pixels that contain roads. Another algorithm took those pixels and stitched them together into a network of roads which could then be analyzed and split into quadrants. Once everything is laid out, numbers and letters are assigned to the streets, which serve as addresses. The method makes it easy to determine intersections and other nearby locations because it’s easy to relate where different roads are on the grid based on their assigned number and letter.

The project from MIT and Facebook is not the first effort to solve the issue of unaddressed rural lands. Google introduced Open Location Codes to its maps back in 2015 as a way to label otherwise unmarked areas. Another organization, what3words, has split the globe up in a three-by-three meter square grid and applies a randomly generated, unique three-word combination to every space.

The problem with many of these solutions is that assigning addresses is the easy part of the problem. Getting those addresses widely adopted is the challenge, as they have to be accepted by governments and citizens alike. Despite the hurdles, having addresses is necessary for providing essential services like medical care and package deliveries. It also aids in planning and building infrastructure.

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Apple Music is coming to the Amazon Echo – TechCrunch

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Apple Music is coming to the Amazon Echo – TechCrunch

Starting mid-December, Amazon Echo devices will be able to stream songs from Apple Music. A bit of a surprise, perhaps, given that Apple’s been a competitor in the space since launching the HomePod back in 2017.

Amazon’s had its own music service for some time, as well, but the company appears to have given up on the dream of being a serious competitor in the space — for now, at least. Instead, Echo smart speakers offer native support for a decent cross-section of streaming services, including Pandora, Spotify, iHeartRadio and TuneIn.

The new skill lets users play specifics songs, genres, playlists and the Beats 1 station through the smart speakers. Adding Apple Music will help the popular smart home products tap into a rapidly growing service.

The company cracked 50 million subscribers earlier this year. That’s still well behind the 83 million paid subscribers Spotify announced back in July, but this addition should help give Amazon an added advantage against Google’s Home devices, particularly here in the States, where the bulk of Apple Music subscribers reside.

For Apple’s part, the offering brings Music to much more accessible hardware. The HomePod currently runs $349 — several times the price of the entry-level Echo Dot. The new skill arrives on Echo devices the week of December 17.

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DoJ charges Autonomy founder with fraud over $11BN sale to HP – TechCrunch

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DoJ charges Autonomy founder with fraud over $11BN sale to HP – TechCrunch

U.K. entrepreneur turned billionaire investor Mike Lynch has been charged with fraud in the U.S. over the 2011 sale of his enterprise software company.

Lynch sold Autonomy, the big data company he founded back in 1996, to computer giant HP for around $11 billion some seven years ago.

But within a year around three-quarters of the value of the business had been written off, with HP accusing Autonomy’s management of accounting misrepresentations and disclosure failures.

Lynch has always rejected the allegations, and after HP sought to sue him in U.K. courts he countersued in 2015.

Meanwhile, the U.K.’s own Serious Fraud Office dropped an investigation into the Autonomy sale in 2015 — finding “insufficient evidence for a realistic prospect of conviction.”

But now the DoJ has filed charges in a San Francisco court, accusing Lynch and other senior Autonomy executives of making false statements that inflated the value of the company.

They face 14 counts of conspiracy and fraud, according to Reuters — a charge that carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison.

We’ve reached out to Lynch’s fund, Invoke Capital, for comment on the latest development.

The BBC has obtained a statement from his lawyers, Chris Morvillo of Clifford Chance and Reid Weingarten of Steptoe & Johnson, which describes the indictment as “a travesty of justice,”

The statement also claims Lynch is being made a scapegoat for HP’s failures, framing the allegations as a business dispute over the application of U.K. accounting standards. 

Two years ago we interviewed Lynch onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt London and he mocked the morass of allegations still swirling around the acquisition as “spin and bullshit.”

Following the latest developments, the BBC reports that Lynch has stepped down as a scientific adviser to the U.K. government.

“Dr. Lynch has decided to resign his membership of the CST [Council for Science and Technology] with immediate effect. We appreciate the valuable contribution he has made to the CST in recent years,” a government spokesperson told it.

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