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Bernie Sanders responds to Hickenlooper with mocking video from FDR

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Bernie Sanders responds to Hickenlooper with mocking video from FDR

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., seemed to mock fellow 2020 candidate John Hickenlooper after the former Colorado governor rebuked Sanders’ endorsement of Democratic socialism.

On Thursday, Sanders posted a video of former President Franklin D. Roosevelt appearing to attack politicians who acted as though they could implement his “New Deal” programs better and without the large price tag.

“Let me warn the nation against the smooth evasion that says ‘Of course we believe these things. We believe in Social Security, we believe in work for the unemployed, we believe in saving homes, cross our hearts and hope to die — we believe in all these things but we don’t like the way the present administration is doing them,'” Roosevelt said, apparently mocking his critics.

SANDERS EMBRACES DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISM, CALLS FOR NEW DEAL REVIVAL IN CAMPAIGN ADDRESS

“‘Just turn them over to us. We will do all of them. We will do more of them, we ill do them better, and most important of all, the doing of them will not cost anybody anything.'”

The video seemed to imply that candidates like Hickenlooper falsely claimed they could achieve similar results through policies much different than Sanders’.

Hickenlooper, during a speech in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, directly called out Sanders’ brand of Democratic socialism.

“Democrats must say loudly and clearly that we are not socialists. If we do not, we will end up helping to reelect the worst president in the country’s history,” Hickenlooper said, predicting that socialism merely helped President Trump attack Democrats.

“Socialism is the most efficient attack line Republicans can use against Democrats as long as Trump is at the top of the ticket,” he said.

CANDACE OWENS SPARS WITH DR. CORNEL WEST OVER THE IMPACT OF SOCIALISM ON AFRICAN-AMERICANS

His remarks followed Sanders’ impassioned defense of his philosophy Wednesday, when he called on progressives to ignore “massive attacks from those who attempt to use the word ‘socialism’ as a slur.”

Hickenlooper also advocated domestic policies that would avoid the large costs associated with some of the ideas Sanders supported, including the Green New Deal and free college.

“Each candidate, I think, has a responsibility — however, they want to do it — to draw that line and say, ‘Hey, I’m not a socialist,’” Hickenlooper said. “Not all the candidates like it when I say that.”

Sanders’ response seemed to signify growing tension between centrists and the more progressive wing of the party — something that popped up in criticisms of 2020 frontrunner and former Vice President Joe Biden.

BERNIE SANDERS: AMERICANS ‘WILL BE DELIGHTED TO PAY MORE IN TAXES’ FOR FREE HEALTH CARE, EDUCATION

Both Hickenlooper and former Rep. John Delaney, D-Md., another 2020 hopeful, appeared to be the most outspoken critics of more progressive policies pushed among their fellow 2020 candidates.

Delaney, in June, warned of what he called the Democratic Party’s growing “intolerance” towards centrist views. That came after progressive icon Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., — whose endorsement Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., reportedly sought — told him to “sashay away” from the race over his opposition to “Medicare for all.” That position also provoked boo’s when he spoke at the California Democratic Convention.

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“Intolerance to different ideas is part of the problem. And that is something I think that is getting very dangerous and concerning in the Democratic Party right now,” he said.

Ocasio-Cortez’s “Green New Deal,” which plays off of Roosevelt’s sweeping economic reforms, found support among Biden and Warren, who both referenced the effort in the environmental plans they said they would push as president.

The Associated Press and Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

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Trump accuser says most people think of rape as being ‘sexy’ in interview

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Trump accuser says most people think of rape as being 'sexy' in interview

E. Jean Carroll, the writer who accused President Trump of sexually assaulting her in the mid-1990s, raised eyebrows when she said in an interview that most people consider rape “sexy.”

The longtime advice columnist for Elle Magazine appeared on the channel to detail the allegations from 23 years ago in a dressing room. She said the incident wasn’t “sexual” and likened it to a “fight.”

LONGTIME ADVICE COLUMNIST E. JEAN CARROLL ACCUSES TRUMP OF SEXUAL ASSAULT IN 1990S

“I was not thrown on the ground and ravaged. The word rape carries so many sexual connotations. This was not sexual. It just hurt,” she said.

Anderson Cooper, the CNN host, asked Carroll about her refusal to use word rape and pointed out that most people describe rape as a violent assault.

“I think most people think of rape as being sexy. Think of the fantasies,” Carroll replied. The interview was interrupted by a commercial break.

New York magazine on Friday published the allegations as part of an excerpt from her forthcoming book in which she accuses Trump, and other men, of improper sexual behavior.

She claimed the Trump incident occurred at Bergdorf Goodman in either the fall of 1995 or the spring of 1996. Trump has denied the allegations. He was criticized for saying in an interview that she is not his type.

Carroll is known for her “Ask E. Jean” column, which runs in Elle magazine.

WINNING UGLY? MEDIA HIT TRUMP STYLE OVER IRAN, BUT SOMETIMES IT WORKS

In the excerpt, Carroll, who had a daily advice show at the time, said Trump recognized her and asked for her help choosing a gift. She said they eventually made their way into the lingerie section, and then a dressing room.

“The moment the dressing-room door is closed, he lunges at me, pushes me against the wall, hitting my head quite badly and puts his mouth against my lips,” Carroll wrote. In explicit detail, Carroll wrote that Trump held her against a wall and pulled down her tights.

“The next moment, still wearing correct business attire, shirt, tie, suit jacket, overcoat, he opens the overcoat, unzips his pants, and, forcing his fingers around my private area, thrusts his penis halfway — or completely, I’m not certain — inside me,” she said. “It turns into a colossal struggle.”

After coming forward with her allegations, Carroll told MSNBC on Friday that despite the alleged ordeal, she won’t pursue the allegations in court due to the migrant detention situation at the southern border, saying it would be “disrespectful.

“I would find it disrespectful to the women who are down on the border who are being raped around the clock down there without any protection,” Carroll said. “As you know, the women have very little protection there. It would just be disrespectful.”

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Trump released a lengthy statement vehemently denying the allegations: “I’ve never met this person in my life. She is trying to sell a new book — that should indicate her motivation. It should be sold in the fiction section.”

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Trump reassures Tokyo he will stick with security pact: Japan government

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Trump reassures Tokyo he will stick with security pact: Japan government

TOKYO (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday reassured Japan he was committed to a military treaty that both nations have described as a cornerstone of security in Asia, after a media report said he had spoken privately about withdrawing from the pact.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during delivering a speech to Japanese and U.S. troops as they aboard Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s (JMSDF) helicopter carrier DDH-184 Kaga at JMSDF Yokosuka base in Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Japan, May 28, 2019. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha/File Photo

Citing unidentified sources, Bloomberg reported on Monday that Trump had discussed ending the pact which he believed is one-sided because it obligated the United States to defend Japan if attacked but did not require Tokyo to respond in kind.

The report said Trump was also unhappy with plans to relocate the U.S. base on Japan’s Okinawa island.

“The thing reported in the media you mentioned does not exist,” chief government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo when asked about the report.

“We have received confirmation from the U.S. president it is incompatible with the U.S. government policy,” he added.

Under the security agreement, the United States has committed to defend Japan, which renounced the right to wage war after its defeat in World War Two.

Japan in return provides military bases that Washington uses to project power deep into Asia, including the biggest concentration of U.S. Marines outside the United States on Okinawa, and the forward deployment of an aircraft carrier strike group at the Yokosuka naval base near Tokyo.

Ending the pact, which also puts Japan under the U.S. nuclear umbrella, could force Washington to withdraw a major portion of its military forces from Asia at a time when China’s military power is growing.

It would also force Japan to seek new alliances in the region and bolster its own defenses, which in turn could raise concern about nuclear proliferation in the already tense region.

Washington’s close ties to Tokyo have also benefited U.S. military contractors such as Lockheed Martin Corp and Raytheon Co, which have sold billions of dollars of equipment to Japan’s Self Defense Forces.

On a visit to Japan in May, Trump said he expected Japan’s military to reinforce U.S. forces throughout Asia and elsewhere as Tokyo bolsters the ability of its forces to operate further from its shores.

Part of that military upgrade includes a commitment by Japan to buy 97 F-35 stealth fighters, including some short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL)B variants worth more than $8 billion.

Japan says it eventually wants to field a force of around 150 of the advanced fighter jets, the biggest outside the U.S. military, as it tries to keep ahead of China’s advances in military technology.

Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka; writing by Tim Kelly; editing by Darren Schuettler

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U.S. president confirms no withdrawal from security pact: Japan

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TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s top government spokesman said on Tuesday the United States has confirmed its defense treaty with Japan after a report suggested U.S. President Donald Trump considered withdrawing from the pact.

Bloomberg reported on Monday that Trump has recently spoken privately about withdrawing from the treaty as he is of the view that the pact treated the United States unfairly.

“The thing reported in the media you mentioned does not exist,” Yoshihide Suga told reporters in Tokyo.

“We have received confirmation from the U.S. president it is incompatible with the U.S. government policy,” he added.

Reporting by Kiyoshi Takenaka; editing by Darren Schuettler

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